Category Archives: 1 Minute Wonder

WordPress 1 Minute Wonder – Quick Performance Boosts

WordPress One Minute Wonder

This latest WordPress 1 Minute Wonder installation covers a couple of quick alternative steps that can be taken to dramatically increase your site performance… and yes I’ll be honest and say that actually to cover all 3 steps here it takes more like 10 minutes.

In the below investigation I based “performance” on Google’s PageSpeed rating and Yahoo’s YSlow and this was run against a newly launched online craft store site called Designs and Such.

Step 1 – Optimise Images

Using the PageSpeed tool (in Chrome) it was possible to  see that I had several un-optimised images on my site. I processed these with the free optipng tool and instantly saw an increase in 6 PageSpeed points and  2 YSlow points. Not bad for something which anyone can do.

Step 2 – W3-Total-Cache Plugin

Now there is some stigma around having lots of plugins on your WordPress site and the detrimental affect it can have on performance… now whether you back this line of thought or not* sometimes plugins can really benefit your site in this context. Now please be sure to backup your DB (or entire site) before using any plugins which might modify you’re .htaccess and potentially other files in your installation.

For my investigation I installed the W3-Total-Cache plugin and configured it just to cache and minify my HTML, JS and CSS. The results were staggering… I saw an overall increase of 11 Google PageSpeeed points and 12 YSlow points

Step 3 – .htaccess Tweaks

Another step, this time plugin-free, should immediately give some good results. Simply by adding the following lines to one of my site’s .htaccess file I saw a further 4 point increase in my PageSpeed score and a 1 point increase in Yahoo’s YSLow rating.

The following lines do 2 things, add expire headers to static files such as CSS, javascript and images and also removing ETags. Of course please backup your .htaccess before doing any of this.

#Expire Header
ExpiresActive On
ExpiresDefault A0
ExpiresByType image/gif A2592000
ExpiresByType image/png A2592000
ExpiresByType image/jpg A2592000
ExpiresByType image/jpeg A2592000
ExpiresByType image/ico A2592000
ExpiresByType text/css A2592000
ExpiresByType text/javascript A2592000

FileETag none

This is defining a 1 month expiry for all content covered by the files types listed above. Note if you do this there’ll be implications if you want to modify any of the files, like CSS, and have the changes to affect immediately.

This technique (and more info on it) was found over at Tips & Tricks HQ

The overall results

So in total by carrying out the above steps I saw the following performance increase. Of course the results will vary site by site but I believe that with Search Engines using site performance as a factor when ranking your site that 10 minutes spent here will be of value.

Google PageSpeed Increase = 21

Yahoo YSlow Increase = 15

[jbox color="blue" vgradient="#fdfeff|#bae3ff" title="Found this useful?"]If you’ve used this technique on your site for performance reasons and have some results then please leave them in the comments.[/jbox]

* When speaking to @westi at WordCamp UK (or WordCamp Manchester) in 2010 he said that putting code in plugins rather than the core should result in no performance hit… of course it depends on the quality of code

WordPress 1 Minute Wonder – Styling Widgets on Pages Horizontally

WordPress One Minute Wonder

In this edition of WordPress 1 Minute Wonders I will answer a question which I frequently get emailed about… and that is how to style widgets next to each other when using my Widgets on Pages WordPress plugin.

In this post I have 3 widgets in one of the sidebars created by the plugin. I have named the sidebar horiz.

[widgets_on_pages id="horiz"]

To get the Widgets to display as they do above there was some extra CSS that I had to add to my theme’s style.css file to get them to display like this… here it is.

#horiz {
  overflow: auto;margin: 10p;padding: 10px;
}
#horiz .widget {
  float: left;
  width: 25%;
  padding: 2%;
  background: #f1f1f1;
  border:1px solid #999;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  -o-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  -moz-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  -webkit-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  -o-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  margin: 0 1%;
 }

I have put a fair amount of styling in there to make them look a bit more appealing but essentially the important bit that makes the widgets sit next to each other can be done with just the following;

#horiz {
  overflow: auto;
}
#horiz .widget {
  float: left;
  width: 25%;
  padding: 2%;
  margin: 0 1%;
 }

In the first section we style the whole sidebar (you would replace .horiz with whatever you had called your sidebar), making sure that the content overflow is set to auto. This makes sure that any content following the sidebar does not also creep up alongside the widgets.

The second section styles the widgets (all three in this case). The key part here is the float:left; which makes them site alongside each other.

[jbox color="blue" vgradient="#fdfeff|#bae3ff" title="Found this useful?"]If you’ve used this tip why not subscribe to my feed or check out the first item in the WordPress 1 Minute Wonder series?[/jbox]

WordPress Gravatar Hovercard

WordPress 1 Minute Wonder – Adding Gravatar Hovercards

WordPress One Minute Wonder

As a sequal to the debut entry of the “WordPress 1 Minute Wonder” series which talked about styling author comments differently to other comments this post extends the usefulness of your comments by adding Gravatar Hovercards to you site/blog. This posts presumes that you know what Gravtars are (if not check them out).

Again, in true WordPress 1 Minute Wonder fashion this is a dead simple thing to enable and involves nothing more than copy and paste and (s)FTP access to your site. In fact before I show you the steps I should credit the guys at WebBlogToolsCollection for this… in this case I simply a messenger.

So to get this working simply copy and paste the following code into your theme’s function.php file (create one if it doesn’t exist).

wp_enqueue_script( 'gprofiles',
'http://s.gravatar.com/js/gprofiles.js', array( 'jquery' ),
'e', true );

This should give your comments’ avatars a nice hovercard affect if you hover over them.

WordPress Gravatar Hovercard

It’s that simple and useful… brilliant.

To get the most out of this feature (on your site and on others that you comment on) make sure you update the info on your Gravatar profile.

[jbox color="blue" vgradient="#fdfeff|#bae3ff" title="Found this useful?"]If you’ve used this tip and now have Gravatar hovercards working on your WordPress powered website or blog why not subscribe to my feed or check out the first item in the WordPress 1 Minute Wonder series?[/jbox]

Styled Author Comment

WordPress 1 Minute Wonder – Styling Author Comments

This is the first in the series of my 1 Minute Wonder series for WordPress where I’ll be showing simple and quick tricks for WordPress to add a little extra to your blog or WordPress powered website. And in this series debut I’ll be showing you how to add extra styling to the comments made by the post author.

So a quick caveat… this trick depends on your theme’s implementation… hopefully it’s been created with all the correct semantic markup needed. If you find this doesn’t work then to resolve the issue may take slightly longer than the one minute.

So here we go, all you really need to do is add the following to your current theme’s style.css file (usually located in ~/wp-content/themes/<theme_name>/ directory);

.commentlist li.bypostauthor {
  background: #f1f1f1;
  border:1px solid #999;
  -moz-border-radius: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
  -o-border-radius: 10px;
  border-radius: 10px;
  -moz-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  -webkit-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  -o-box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
  box-shadow: 3px 3px 7px #999;
}

What we’ve done here is added extra styling to give the author’s comments a background specific background colour with a nice rounded border and a subtle box shadow. The rounding of the corners and the shadow are created using CSS3 so may not show on older browsers.

Styled Author Comment

Styled Author Comment

This styling can be seen on this very blog over at this post on the Responsive TwentyTen child theme for WordPress. Of course the comment can be styled in any manner of ways depending on the CSS you apply.

[jbox color="blue" vgradient="#fdfeff|#bae3ff" title="Found this useful?"]If you’ve used this technique on your site for styling comments then please leave me a comment below with a link so I can take a peak.[/jbox]