Do-Less JS Tooling Workshop

On my journey to beefing up my Frontend development skills (primarily Javascript) I’ve also been trying to get up to speed with some of the tools that are commonly being used to improve workflows and encourage development best practices. To a relative newcomer I feel that it was all a little overwhelming… the number of package managers, development and testing frameworks and task-automation tools was (is) just quite amazing… and to be honest it left me fairly confused as which tool I should be using to do which job.

I was relieved then to see an Embracing Javascript Tooling workshop date pop up in my twitter stream… looking at the details for the event I was please by the topics covered, which included npm and bower, grunt and gulp, these were tools I’d been playing with but was still unsure as to which to use and when. The workshop was the very first one being run by Jack Franklin and Ollie Jennings under the Do-Less banner and I was pleased to give them support so thought I’d put my name down.

The one-day workshop took place in Bath at The Guild co-working space, a really beautiful building that suited our needs just fine. On arrival I was treated to a small but welcoming goody-bag which included a bottle of pop and some haribo, an ideal sugar-rush or two for whenever I need it. The workshop essentially ran through a couple of small projects and tasks, with the morning session covering them using Grunt and the afternoon re-doing them with Gulp, with both sessions making use of npm and bower. The workshop really expected at least some minimal knowledge of JS. And being comfortable with git and the command prompt was certainly useful since the pace was quite stiff, thankfully this suited me just fine. As well as this we also briefly covered Yo and Yeoman and there was ample time for questions as we went.

All-in-all I was very pleased with what I got from the workshop and wish both Jack and Ollie well with any future events they hold. And personally it certainly helped clear up a few queries I had, although I think that perhaps coming to the workshop without any experience of at least some of the tools might give attendees a very steep learning curve.

As a small take-away, it does seem that to a frontend developer, every possible issue is a nail that and be bashed with a Javascript hammer (and perhaps they’re right?).

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